Youngest Boeing 777 Female Commander

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by GatorJ, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. GatorJ

    GatorJ Hopeful
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  2. bradgator2

    bradgator2 1/29/17 half marathon - 1 hour, 34 min, 2 secs
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    Is she hot?
     
  3. GatorBart

    GatorBart :bandit:
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    Um...........yes - did you not click on the article? (though it may not be as 'interesting' as Chief's)
    Here's the 30-year-old Indian Air pilot - Anny Divya.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. bradgator2

    bradgator2 1/29/17 half marathon - 1 hour, 34 min, 2 secs
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    No, I didnt :lol:
     
  5. Zambo

    Zambo Poo Flinger
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  6. ThreatMatrix

    ThreatMatrix Well he's not Mac - so we got that going for us
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  7. MidwestChomp

    MidwestChomp Fun was the goal and we hit the bullseye
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    I wouldn't mind having her as a pilot.

    anny.JPG
     
  8. deuce

    deuce I'm not as smart as I look!
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    I would think there would be audio and visual alarms if the gears were down during flight......
     
  9. Zambo

    Zambo Poo Flinger
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    No idea how the airbus is wired but the Boeing only has alarms that go off if your gear are not down and you're getting too low.
     
  10. Bernardo de la Paz

    Bernardo de la Paz No Talent Ass Clown
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    How many times have you set that one off?
     
  11. Zambo

    Zambo Poo Flinger
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    Man I'm always forgetting to put those pesky landing gear down.
     
  12. LagoonGator68

    LagoonGator68 Well-Used Member
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    "The drag created by the wheels reduced the speed of the plane to 230 knots instead of 500 knots, and it also restricted the plane’s climb, flying at a low altitude of 24,000 feet compared to the usual altitude of 37,000 feet."

    Would trigger questions?
     
  13. ChiefGator

    ChiefGator A Chief and a Gator, Master of the Ignore list!!!!

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    On the opposite end of age there is this from the NYT https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/28/business/japan-older-workers-retired-pilot.html?_r=0

    Shigekazu Miyazaki is spending what should have been his retirement 25,000 feet in the air.

    Mr. Miyazaki, a pilot with nearly four decades’ experience at All Nippon Airways, Japan’s largest airline, left the carrier last year at its mandatory retirement age of 65. But rather than take up golf or fishing, Mr. Miyazaki since April has been piloting 39-seat propeller planes for Oriental Air Bridge, a tiny airline that connects the southwestern city of Nagasaki to a group of remote islands.

    “I never would have thought I’d still be flying at 65,” Mr. Miyazaki, who is trim and has a deep voice and a full head of gray hair, said before a recent flight. “But I’m still healthy, and I love to fly, so why not do it as long as I can?”

    A man in his seventh decade extending his commercial flying career still qualifies as a novelty in Japan — but maybe not for long.

    The aging of Japan’s work force is prompting a rethinking of traditional career paths and government safety nets. The country has the world’s longest life expectancy, little immigration and a dwindling population of young workers, the result of decades of low birthrates. Last month, the Japanese government said the number of births last year fell below one million for the first time since it began tracking the figure in 1899.

    All of that makes older workers more crucial to the economy. More than half of Japanese men over the age of 65 do some kind of paid work, according to government surveys, compared with a third of American men and as little as 10 percent in parts of Europe.

    Photo
    [​IMG]

    Mr. Miyazaki, second from the right, with crew members at Nagasaki Airport. The aging of Japan’s work force is prompting a rethinking of traditional career paths and government safety nets. Credit Kazuhiro Yokozeki for The New York Times
    Japan’s economy is beginning to hum again, thanks largely to demand for its exports, but its lack of workers could limit growth. Unemployment is a rock-bottom 2.8 percent, and companies are scrambling to find staff. At the same time, retiring baby boomers are straining the pension system, prompting the government to raise the age at which older people can collect benefits.

    Japan may offer a peek into the near future for other developed countries with aging work forces, including the United States.

    “If places like Germany and the United States are raising the age where people can collect pensions to 67, there’s no reason Japan shouldn’t go to 70,” said Atsushi Seike, an expert on labor economics at Keio University in Tokyo. “We’re reaching a point where a 40-year career is just half the average life span, and having people become inactive too early is unsustainable.”

    Older workers may also partly explain the puzzle of Japan’s stagnant wages, which have barely budged despite low unemployment. Older workers generally earn much less than at the peak of their careers, offsetting increases among the young and middle-aged.

    Oriental Air Bridge had never hired a pilot Mr. Miyazaki’s age before, but, with skilled pilots in short supply nationwide, it has been expanding its recruiting.

    For Mr. Miyazaki, the choice to keep flying was a luxury. As a captain at All Nippon, where he flew Boeing 767s, primarily to Southeast Asia, he earned the equivalent of several hundred thousand dollars a year plus a generous pension. Oriental Air Bridge pays him only about a third of his peak salary, but he says he does not mind.

    Photo
    [​IMG]

    Under Japanese regulations, Mr. Miyazaki will have to stop flying commercially at 68, but the government has started examining whether to extend the maximum age to 70. Credit Kazuhiro Yokozeki for The New York Times
    “The jets I used to fly were highly automated,” he said. “But now, with the propeller planes, I can enjoy a freer, more visual kind of flying. It means getting back to the basics as a pilot.”
    In the cockpit of Mr. Miyazaki’s Bombardier Dash 8, flying still looks plenty complicated.

    Seems great to me, he continues to fly and gets paid to do so. Being away from home is the only down side and some would be happy with that as well.
     

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