Very Basic Home Repair Help

Gator By Marriage

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Home inspection report is mostly like tits on a boar hog. Cooter keeps telling you not to drain the pool entirely. Look at breaker box for GFI breakers. You can kill yourself messing with electrical stuff with skills like yours. Go to Lowe’s and buy a big yellow book about 9”x12” and about 1 1/2” thick hard bound called Basic Home Maintenance and Improvement or something like that. Never, ever work on 220Volt circuits like range, dryer, HVAC, water heater.....etc.....you can learn, but be safe! Plumbing repair on an old house never goes well....Good luck!......btw, when was your house built?

ok, looked....Lowe’s book is blue “Complete Home Repair and Maintenance”; yellow book is Readers Digest “Complete Do It Yourself Manual”....they are equally good imo.
Late to the thread, but this was going to be my suggestion. Years ago I bought a book at Home Depot called “Wiring 1-2-3.” I knew a little at the time but thought I knew more as I came to find out! @Alumni Guy none of this is rocket science, but there is a lot to remember. You’ll be amazed what you can learn by reading (and watching YouTube videos), and as you have clearly figured out, by asking questions. I’ve known a lot of contractors and subs over the years and rare is the one who won’t answer a question or two. (Especially if you’re buying the beer!) For the most part, they love what they do and love to talk about it - especially if you let them pick the topic. It’s all instructive, even if you don’t think it will apply to anything you’ll ever do. @crosscreekcooter started a thread about an old farmhouse he was helping to restore. Not sure I’ll ever use any of what he wrote, but I kept up with every post and really enjoyed seeing the final product. The “how to” parts were fascinating.
 

Alumni Guy

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I keep my electric work very basic. Just installed the gfi on the start of a circuit, and that’s as far as electric work as I’ll go.

I’m smart enough to know how dumb I am.

I’d never do work on a major appliance, or do a rewrire, or install a new box.

it’s a tough line to walk: to proud and cheap to hire a handyman, but the realization that I don’t know it all. Id never risk safety or a major expense due to my screw up, but I gotta learn.

However, one thing we all agree on, whether a newbie like me, or a seasoned carpenter: measure twice, cut once, and god bless YouTube.
 

grengadgy

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I keep my electric work very basic. Just installed the gfi on the start of a circuit, and that’s as far as electric work as I’ll go.

I’m smart enough to know how dumb I am.

I’d never do work on a major appliance, or do a rewrire, or install a new box.

it’s a tough line to walk: to proud and cheap to hire a handyman, but the realization that I don’t know it all. Id never risk safety or a major expense due to my screw up, but I gotta learn.

However, one thing we all agree on, whether a newbie like me, or a seasoned carpenter: measure twice, cut once, and god bless YouTube.
One of the biggest mistake a beginner makes in house wiring is crossing their neutrals (white) wire and their hot (usually black). It's a matter of safety.
 

Alumni Guy

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One of the biggest mistake a beginner makes in house wiring is crossing their neutrals (white) wire and their hot (usually black). It's a matter of safety.
No doubt, I was super cautious.

Took a photo of the wiring before removal to compare to my finished work. Tried to keep it one wire at a time.

Flipping the breaker back on, and plugging something in was very scary. The tension was real.
 

grengadgy

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No doubt, I was super cautious.

Took a photo of the wiring before removal to compare to my finished work. Tried to keep it one wire at a time.

Flipping the breaker back on, and plugging something in was very scary. The tension was real.
Normally what you did is good practice but sometimes it was wired wrong from the beginning. I have found houses wired wrong but usually it's just a DIY project wired incorrectly. Lowes{Bosch) paid a professional to install my dishwasher and lately instead of junking it I decided to check the hard wiring. It was reverse wired and Bosch had spent over $500 trying to repair it and finally wrote it off with a full refund including the installation cost. I fixed the reverse wiring and all the timers have been working now. Actually it was the warranty company that gave me the refund.

This article hits it lightly and Cooter mentioned the plug-in circuit checker that will check the wiring. Dangers of Reversed Polarity | 8 Points Home Inspection
 
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cover2

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This must be the time for pump problems. Daughter and some friends stayed the weekend at the lake place. Got a call Monday pm that a pipe had busted on the pump. As I had an appt at Shands on Tuesday, today was the day to do repairs. Here’s what I found...

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Evidently, torque from the motor turning on over time broke down the threads and it came loose. Thank goodness I had showed daughter where the pump switch was. Off to Home Depot for pipe and fittings.
 

cover2

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New piping installed, problem solved...but not so fast. After letting the glue set and hitting the switch, nothing. Checked the power and found the pump switch had quit (broken point). I’m getting old and out of practice. Should have checked that when first inspecting the problem! More tomorrow. I need a beer.
 

bradgator2

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That’s ok, the shaft on my pump broke in March. Clean sheer break. Out of warranty of course. We still called Pentair and they didn’t believe it. Long story short.... they replaced it out of warranty.
 

wrpgator

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I was fortunate to buy a home, even more fortunate to buy one with a pool.

I always thought I could do the basics, but I’m getting humbled by my lack of knowledge on a lot of home repair.

I see guys putting up pergolas, installing built in bars, etc, and I was proud I installed led lights that consisted of pulling out the can and putting in new ones. I really am impressed by everyone’s skills, and I hope to get 1/3rd of the way there.

So, it is my full intent to exploit your skills for my personal gain. I’m a pirate like that.

Here’s my basic repair question. My pool needs to be drained. Tons of rain in west palm this week.

Unfortunately, the previous owner doesn’t have a proper hose attachment from the pool pump. Fortunately, the valve is installed, but I just need to attach a drainage hose to the pvc.

The pvc is 6 inch circumference. The pipe ends with a rough cut, with no fittings on the end.

What are the tools and steps required to get drainage a hose attached to a 6 inch PVC pipe?

I really appreciate any help you can give this 1st time home owner.
Alum, it you specialize in lien law, you'll always have contractors & subs in your office to pick their brains.
 

TheDouglas78

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Bought my house on a short sale, and it was mostly in great condition, but some minor home things. Youtube was a great resource and learned how to do outdoor plumbing from my grandfather when we set up the watering system in his garden and mushroom house. The jobs you hate as a kid that pay off as an adult.
 

Alumni Guy

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Alum, it you specialize in lien law, you'll always have contractors & subs in your office to pick their brains.
That’s a sneaky area of the law, lots of technical time and language requirements that without perfect compliance, a sub/materialman can lose their lien rights.

However, a valid lien is powerful, and can jam up some deals.
 

wrpgator

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That’s a sneaky area of the law, lots of technical time and language requirements that without perfect compliance, a sub/materialman can lose their lien rights.

However, a valid lien is powerful, and can jam up some deals.
Agree. I'm a general contractor and have become familiar with the lien law out of necessity. Some owner's in-house counsels write contracts with 'no lien' language and try to have contractor indemnify them for any liens filed by subs / materialmen. When I see those clauses, I rewrite them to my liking and return them. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.
 

crosscreekcooter

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I always preferred the AIA forms for the meat and the 702-703's -but the lien laws change state to state

@cover2 -nice straight and clean re-pipe-no purple primer?
 
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Alumni Guy

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Agree. I'm a general contractor and have become familiar with the lien law out of necessity. Some owner's in-house counsels write contracts with 'no lien' language and try to have contractor indemnify them for any liens filed by subs / materialmen. When I see those clauses, I rewrite them to my liking and return them. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.
I would never agree to a no lien clause, unless a bond is posted. There’s a reason investors set up single asset LLC’s; if it fails, they and their other assets are shielded

If an investor goes belly up, the equity in the home is the only thing you got to get paid.

Never tie your financial stability to that of another....

unless you got a hot sugar-momma wife.
 

wrpgator

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I always preferred the AIA forms for the meat and the 702-703's -but the lien laws change state to state

@cover2 -nice straight and clean re-pipe-no purple primer?
AIA contracts are very fair, AGC helped in the wording. Many owners will not accept a AIA contracts unfortunately...especially the national companies who have in-house counsel. I've seen these draconian contracts, one sided in the extreme. I usually try to re-write them and submit for review and sometimes this works...especially if the job was already bid and they used my numbers for budgeting. Good owners will provide a sample contract form prior to the bid so you can decide up front if you want to deal with it or not--but good owners are rare. The biggest issue I have with corporately written contracts is liability indemnity language. Many insert broad-form, i.e. if there's an accident with injury or death and it's deemed to be 1% contractor's fault and 99% owner's fault...contractor is obligated to hold owner harmless from all claims, costs, attorneys, etc. etc. I usually rewrite that we'll hold owner harmless 'only to the extent contractor is responsible'. Many times they agree but I've had some tell me 'our policy is no changes to the contract', and then I move on. And many contractors sign contracts not understanding or not caring about their exposure.
 

wrpgator

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I would never agree to a no lien clause, unless a bond is posted. There’s a reason investors set up single asset LLC’s; if it fails, they and their other assets are shielded

If an investor goes belly up, the equity in the home is the only thing you got to get paid.

Never tie your financial stability to that of another....

unless you got a hot sugar-momma wife.
Correct me if I'm wrong but I think No lien contracts are not enforceable in Florida. Many owners try to get us to submit unconditional waivers before sending payment, but of course we can't do that. We did find that when an owner records an affidavit of no liens--taking the real property out of a potential claim when improvements are made for a lessee & contractor is not in privity with owner--that leaves leasehold improvements only to be leined...and those usually hold little value for a party that has not been paid.
 

cover2

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@cover2 -nice straight and clean re-pipe-no purple primer?
I did on the old to new connection :embarrassed:. That stuff wasn’t around when I’d plumb a little years back, so I’m still not convinced it isn’t part of a yankee or communist conspiracy. I appreciate the compliment on the pipe work. Grandad always said a neat job was your calling card. I try to do that but occasionally it gets away from me.

4C9E9067-EA86-487E-BC49-A7441CDE55CB.jpeg

Got the new pressure switch put in this afternoon. As you can see, it was past time. I’ve still got some updating to do, so this fix is temporary...

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We’ve had this place about 9 mos. and have done a bit of fixing up. When the pipe blew and the pressure switch took a dump, it was a matter of getting it going to keep things in the yard watered and be able to bathe and use the head inside. Getting past this weekend, the plan is to house the UF cable feeding the pump in a covered junction box and wrap the wire feeding the switch in flexible conduit. After that, figuring a way to secure the pump to keep it relatively still when it cycles on is needed. Otherwise, I’ll be replacing the pipe again. I’m slowly remembering things I used to do, but I can’t do them nearly as fast.
 

grengadgy

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I did on the old to new connection :embarrassed:. That stuff wasn’t around when I’d plumb a little years back, so I’m still not convinced it isn’t part of a yankee or communist conspiracy. I appreciate the compliment on the pipe work. Grandad always said a neat job was your calling card. I try to do that but occasionally it gets away from me.

22062


Got the new pressure switch put in this afternoon. As you can see, it was past time. I’ve still got some updating to do, so this fix is temporary...

22063


We’ve had this place about 9 mos. and have done a bit of fixing up. When the pipe blew and the pressure switch took a dump, it was a matter of getting it going to keep things in the yard watered and be able to bathe and use the head inside. Getting past this weekend, the plan is to house the UF cable feeding the pump in a covered junction box and wrap the wire feeding the switch in flexible conduit. After that, figuring a way to secure the pump to keep it relatively still when it cycles on is needed. Otherwise, I’ll be replacing the pipe again. I’m slowly remembering things I used to do, but I can’t do them nearly as fast.
I would probably use a transition set-up . galvanized pipe to take the heat and vibration of the motor and then go to pvc....
 

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