Any serious chiliheads in the house?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by crosscreekcooter, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. stephenPE

    stephenPE Senior Member
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    My buddy had that shirt
     
  2. LagoonGator68

    LagoonGator68 Well-Used Member
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    It is still the same.
     
  3. Gatordiddy

    Gatordiddy Fondling Member
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    I've heard the reservation has encroached all over the place... closing off Pensacola street by the stadium
     
  4. LagoonGator68

    LagoonGator68 Well-Used Member
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    Soaked the taxpayers for billions...re routed Pensacola St., bought all of Gaines St. And changed it to 2 lanes....mind boggling....
     
  5. MJMGator

    MJMGator Slightly amused
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    Never made it with shrooms. I'll have to add them in next time.
     
  6. cover2

    cover2 I've grown old
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    I've learned more about peppers just reading this thread than I ever knew before, and yes, Brad's skillet looks awesome! I don't eat the hot stuff quite like I used to, but I actually have a pepper project going on. I've got two varieties growing right now, Bird Eye and Rooster Spur. Plan is to make some pepper sauce with them. It will be "Southern Style" and is vinegar based. Pretty simple to make. I use an old liquor bottle usually and get it about half-full of the peppers to start, then simmer 2 cups of vinegar with 2 table spoons of olive oil and two teaspoons each of salt and sugar. You can even add garlic if you like. Pour the hot concoction in the bottle with the peppers and let it set a spell. It's pretty good on greens (turnips, mustards, collards, etc.), but also is good for heating up your barbecue sauces, either homemade or store-bought. I'm at work and can't take any photos, and not to insult the pepper masters, but here's an example of what the Bird Eyes look like:

    [​IMG]

    They make a pretty good sauce.
     
    #26 cover2, Aug 29, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2016
  7. MidwestChomp

    MidwestChomp Fun was the goal and we hit the bullseye
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    Oh I'm so happy this thread is alive again! First, if anyone wants a hot sauce recipe Cooter has some amazing recipes. I made a bunch last year and gave a lot away. People said it was the best hot sauce they ever had.

    I don't want to get too technical, but the ghost pepper turns red at full maturity. So the orange is either some orange Naga pepper, a type of habanero, or a scotch bonnet. Either way they are blazing hot.

    That tiny little guy I think may be some type of bird's eye pepper. Rooster Spur is generally a bit bigger. Long red ones are for sure some type of cayenne. Cooter mentioned the Nu-Mex Big Jim pepper. There a few different Big Jim peppers released by Chili Pepper Institute at the U of New Mexico. My favorite is the standard Nu Mex Big Jim or the Heritage Nu Mex Big Jim. They are hot, but have excellent flavor.

    2 years ago I made the mistake of eating a whole scotch bonnet while at work. I was in pain. Last year my coworker brought in a carolina reaper. I had a piece that was half the size of my pinky nail. My mouth raged for an hour. I never experienced anything like that, but I'd do it again.

    I'm trialing 45 peppers (both hot and sweet) at work this year. Unfortunately they got a bacterial disease and haven't put out a lot of fruit. But, I'll post more about my best of the year if anyone is interested.

    I could go on and on.
     
    #27 MidwestChomp, Sep 1, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017
  8. bradgator2

    bradgator2 1/29/17 half marathon - 1 hour, 34 min, 2 secs
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    Yeah bro.... keep posting about it!!!!!
     
  9. grengadgy

    grengadgy Flat-Earther
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    I thought the orange one was a habanero also. Not hot at first but sneaks up on you.
     
  10. MidwestChomp

    MidwestChomp Fun was the goal and we hit the bullseye
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    My results are in for the 40+ peppers I had the privilege to check out this year at work. Here's a few I really liked

    Maraba or Brazilian Maraba - some claim it's one of the hottest yellow peppers out there. It's hot, but I've had hotter. These peppers are very small, but pack some great flavor and heat. These would be great for sauce.

    Guajillo - a tradition in northern and central Mexico. These are so good. Tough skin, very seedy, not terribly hot, but have a great fruity taste. These are traditionally used for sauce. People dry them, then soak them in water, grind them into paste, and make a nice red sauce.

    Lemon Drop - Can't even give this one justice. Lemony, citrusy, and packs a punch. It's outstanding. There are some other similar varieties you can get called Aji Yellow or Yellow Peru. These are equally good, but don't have the lemon like taste, but just a straight of citrus taste.

    I'll report on more...back to work.
     
  11. crosscreekcooter

    crosscreekcooter Cunning Linguist

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    Dude I try to stay up on different varieties but I have never heard of the Maraba or the Guajilla. I found the image for the Maraba and they look like a Datil or Aji pepper.
     
  12. Frozen Gator

    Frozen Gator Well-Known Member
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    The tiny red peppers could an Orange Grove pepper, they grow wild under the trees in South central Florida and are pretty hot. A friend brought a jar of them up recently. How they got started I"ll leave to the imagination, they've been around since I was a small kid.
     
  13. crosscreekcooter

    crosscreekcooter Cunning Linguist

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    I heard they started out as tadpoles and over many eons turned into walking catfish. Once the birds got ahold of them it was all over with.
     
  14. cover2

    cover2 I've grown old
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    A little pepper sauce story to share...

    I posted earlier about some of my pepper sauce interests and how I'm growing bird eyes and rooster spurs to make my granddaddy's southern pepper sauce that we have eaten forever on greens and such. So, I've made a couple of bottles so far and they're busy cooking off. I get this wild hair and decide to venture outside of the bird eyes and rooster spurs when I come upon a Crown Royal handle bottle, which is kind of what my granddaddy used to make his sauces in. I decide to try a Latin flair to the recipe (which calls for vinegar, olive oil, sugar and salt) and round up some Magdalenas, Jalapenos, and Habaneros. After washing, I stuff the smaller peppers of each variety in the bottle (after cutting a small slit in the sides of each), then cut up the remaining peppers, remove most of the seeds, put them in the bottle, and then cover with the simmering vinegar mixture. I let it cook off for about two weeks. We had some cabbage for supper one night and I decide it's time to try my Latin/Southern blend. Wonderful aroma and the flavor was spicy, but not turn you inside out hot. Really flavorful with the cabbage. About 10:30 that night, I wake up with what feels like a Samurai sword in my solar plexus. I thought I was dying. After a trip to the doctor, he tells me I have a flare up of Gastritis (which I've never had before). Asks me what I ate recently and I tell him about the cabbage and pepper sauce. Now, he's about half my age and a friend of the family, so he looks me in the eye and says "What the hell are you thinking? You're 56 years old! You can't eat that stuff and go to bed anymore!" A part of me died that night. From now on when I'm going to eat some greens or spike the barbecue sauce or dabble with the Latin peppers, I'll have to start with a Prilosec to fight off the afterburner. I've grown old.
     
    #34 cover2, Oct 6, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016
  15. Frozen Gator

    Frozen Gator Well-Known Member
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    Almost 65, there's a special place in heaven for the creators of Prilosec, Nexium, etc
     
  16. MidwestChomp

    MidwestChomp Fun was the goal and we hit the bullseye
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    I'm bringing this thread back up, as pepper time at work has finished.

    But any way, that orange pepper that looks like a habanero may be a type of pepper called Aji Dulce. We grew it last year at work, and it's really good. They have a little heat, but mot much. The peppers have a smoky like sweetness to them.

    See wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ají_dulce


    I just finished canning about 20 jars of hot sauce using the recipes from Cooter. I used 3 different hot peppers from work this year.

    First one is mild to medium called Hot Sheepnose. If you don't like a lot of heat this is a good pepper for you.

    I like a lot of heat so these were my favorite 2:

    Second pepper is called Pusser Pepper. It's a very hot "de arbol" type of pepper (de arbol as the plants can get large and have tree like architecture and stems woody like a tree). Pusser is the last name of the great grandmother of the guy who donated this pepper to my place of employment. I love this pepper. It's hot as hell but as a nice fruity flavor

    Third is called Yellow Peru. It's great. It has a piercing hotness but has a wonderful citrus taste.
     
  17. bradgator2

    bradgator2 1/29/17 half marathon - 1 hour, 34 min, 2 secs
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    Yeah.... we ate some. Dont really recall anything memorable about any of them. But I'm not a pepper connoisseur.
     

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