What is the oldest man made object that you have?

bradgator2

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View attachment 60122
He brought this back as well , need to get it translated

I work with a Chinese physicist. He HATES the Japanese. But I showed this to him.

First, he said "Wow, that is so beautiful. You dont see that style of handwriting anymore. That's actually mostly Chinese characters, which means it probably came from one their farther islands. Definitely Japanese military"

He knows for certain some of it, not so much on the others. He is going to show it some friends who will absolutely be able to translate all of it.

What he knows:
Big letters across the top, going left to right:
"wish/hope/pray" Although the Japanese didnt pray
"power"
"lucky"
"longtime"
"forever"
Basically: They are proclaiming that Japanese Military is Forever Lucky

On the left side, going down:
He thinks "God"
"Killed, specifically with a knife and small cuts"
"the persons name"
"Mr."

On the Right side, going down:
"swore"
"die"
"fight"
"dont care"
Basically: They dont care about fighting to the death

Small in the middle:
All names.
The bottom row is all women.
He thinks they are all people killed, but not certain.
 

bradgator2

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Purchased this recently. It’s a silver Drachm (sometimes called a Drachma) struck sometime between 310-301 BC in the Kingdom Of Macedon. It celebrates Alexander the The Great who ruled that kingdom from 336—323 BC.

The front of the coin is the head of Herakles with a lionskin headdress. Herakles was the son of Zeus and Alkmene. He was the guardian of the mortals and immortals.

The back of the coin is Zeus, seated on a throne without a back, one leg drawn back, holding an eagle and a spectre. The vertical Greek letters on the right side translate to Alexander.

Macedonia (present day Greece) existed from about 600-168 BC, where they were defeated by Romans in the Battle of Pydna.

Nobody is really certain why they made this kind of currency. Typically the ancient Greeks didn’t really use money as we do today. Most scholars believe it was usually given out as a reward at sporting events. They attempted to standardize a Drachma to be 4.3 grams of silver, which was about a day’s wage. These coins were made one at a time using a hammer.

In the bible, Jesus instructed Peter to pay the Jerusalem temple tax with a didrachma (2 of these coins).

IMG_2948.jpeg
IMG_2947.jpeg
IMG_2949.jpeg
 

B52G8rAC

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Purchased this recently. It’s a silver Drachm (sometimes called a Drachma) struck sometime between 310-301 BC in the Kingdom Of Macedon. It celebrates Alexander the The Great who ruled that kingdom from 336—323 BC.

The front of the coin is the head of Herakles with a lionskin headdress. Herakles was the son of Zeus and Alkmene. He was the guardian of the mortals and immortals.

The back of the coin is Zeus, seated on a throne without a back, one leg drawn back, holding an eagle and a spectre. The vertical Greek letters on the right side translate to Alexander.

Macedonia (present day Greece) existed from about 600-168 BC, where they were defeated by Romans in the Battle of Pydna.

Nobody is really certain why they made this kind of currency. Typically the ancient Greeks didn’t really use money as we do today. Most scholars believe it was usually given out as a reward at sporting events. They attempted to standardize a Drachma to be 4.3 grams of silver, which was about a day’s wage. These coins were made one at a time using a hammer.

In the bible, Jesus instructed Peter to pay the Jerusalem temple tax with a didrachma (2 of these coins).

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View attachment 60881
View attachment 60882
Cool.
 

Detroitgator

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Nor as wise, handsome or useful.
Nbc Noice GIF by Law & Order
 

bradgator2

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Not nearly as old a coin made in 300 BC. But how about a 4 dollar bill printed on July 22, 1776. If only this thing could talk about where it’s been:

IMG_2955.jpeg

IMG_2957.jpeg

IMG_2956.jpeg
 

gator1946

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Myself!!

No not really.

I own a continental (paper money that is) Continentals are still not worth a continental.

I also own several Roman coins which I believe are B.C. I haven't looked at them for a long time so I'm not sure.
 

B52G8rAC

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Myself!!

No not really.

I own a continental (paper money that is) Continentals are still not worth a continental.

I also own several Roman coins which I believe are B.C. I haven't looked at them for a long time so I'm not sure.
Having the on the coin be annotated with "BC" provides irrefutable provenance.
 

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